All you need is a text and a reading purpose to start. We do the rest.

LiteracyTA's 5 Step Reading Process is outlined on the left. We provide activities to help teach each step in the process on the right. Select the drop down menu above the activities for more reading purposes/lessons. We make delivering explicit, skill-based instruction easy for you and engaging for your students.

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5 Steps to Confident Reading

Listen carefully to your task
Listen to your teacher when he or she tells you what to do with your reading.
Look at your text
Get to know your text. What do you see? Are there pictures? Are there titles?
Read to understand the topic
Read your text to learn what it is about. What does it say? What is the topic?
Read for main ideas and details
Read the text, again. What are the main ideas? What are the details? Find the beginning, middle, and end.
Write down the main ideas and details
Write down the main ideas and details in your graphic organizer.

5 Steps to Confident Reading

Understand your reading task
Listen to your teacher when he/she tells you what to do with your reading. What are you being asked to read? What skills will you need to use while reading.
Look over your text
Get to know your text. What features do you see? Are there pictures, titles, and/or key words? What do you already know about the topic? What predictions can you make?
Read to understand the topic
Read your text to learn what it is about. What does it say? What is the topic or central message? Reread words or ideas you don’t understand.
Read for main ideas and details
Reread the text. What are the main ideas and supporting details? How are the ideas organized? Why do you think the author wrote this text?
Retell the main ideas and details
Retell the main ideas and supporting details in pictures or words in your graphic organizer.

5 Steps to Confident Reading

Understand your reading task
Read and listen to your reading task. What are you being asked to read? What reading skills can help you read this text? What will you need to do with the information after you have read it?
Preview your text
Get to know your text. What features do you see? Are there visuals, titles, subtitles, and/or key words? What do you already know about the topic? What predictions can you make?
Read for comprehension
Read your text to learn what it is about. What does it say? What is the topic or central message? What words or ideas are important to the overall meaning of the text?
Read for deeper meaning
Look at your reading task, again. Use your reading task to reread for deeper meaning. What are the main ideas and supporting details? How is the text organized from beginning to end? What is the author's purpose?
Organize and record important information
Retell the main ideas and supporting details in your graphic organizer. How will you organize the important information? How will you use this information to complete your task?

5 Steps to Confident Reading

Understand your reading/performance task
Analyze your reading or performance task so you have a purpose for reading. What are you being asked to read? What will you need to know? How are you expected to read your text? What reading skills can help you read this text? What will you have to do with the information once you have read it?
Preview your text
Get to know your text. Scan the text features, headings, and vocabulary. How long is the reading? Are there text features like pictures, graphics, diagrams, and footnotes? Are there unfamiliar words you need to know? What is the text most likely about? What do you know about the topic?
Read for comprehension
Read to understand the topic and genre. What type of text are you reading? What is the text about? What does it say? What words are essential to the meaning or message of the text?
Read for deeper meaning
Use your reading or performance task to guide how you reread your text. Reading for deeper meaning means you analyze and evaluate how ideas are organized and supported. How is the text organized or how do the ideas unfold from beginning to end? What is the speaker/writer’s point of view or purpose for writing the text? Is the information credible and reliable?
Organize and cite important information
Reread your prompt or performance task to learn what information you need to draw from your text. How will you organize the essential ideas? What will you directly quote or paraphrase? How will you cite the source material and integrate it into your writing?
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